Article Critique Help

Order Description

Summarize the journal article for table
the table format:
1)Title/Journal academics
2)Research questions
3)Key findings
4)methodology
5)area literature/ service marketing
6)area of future research

The topic is impact of emotional confidence on purchase behavior among students

You should demonstrate the theory.

Answer

Title: Article Summary and Critique

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Bar-On, R 2010, ‘Emotional Intelligence: An Integral Part of Positive Psychology’, South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 54-62.
2.     Research questions 1.     What is the position of emotional intelligence in positive psychology?

2.     Which is the best research direction in regards to emotional intelligence?

3.     Key findings 1.     Emotional confidence is an integral component of positive psychology.

2.     Future research should be directed towards the crucial role played by emotional confidence in positive psychology.

4.     Methodology This paper takes the form of an empirical study.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing This paper is related to aspects of service marketing because it provides crucial insights into the theoretical elements of emotional intelligence and how best to understand them from the perspective of positive psychology.
6.     Area of future research Based on the findings of this paper, future research should be geared towards establishing a more meaningful relationship between emotional intelligence and the emergence of the contemporary consumerist society

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Bearden, W, Hardesty, D & Rose, R 2001, ‘Consumer Self‐Confidence: Refinements in Conceptualization and Measurement’, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 121-134.
2.     Research questions 1.     Which are the most important dimensions of self-confidence among consumers?

2.     What are the core elements of the ideal model of consumer self-confidence?

3.     Key findings 1.     The most important dimension to consider in the assessment of consumer self-confidence should entail efforts to subject various behavioral measures exhibited by consumers to psychometric analysis.

2.     The paper led to the creation of a six-factor correlated model. The model comprises of six elements: social outcomes, personal outcomes, consideration-set formation, marketplace interfaces, persuasion knowledge, and information acquisition.

 

4.     Methodology Scale-development procedures were used to develop a model of consumer self-confidence.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing This paper contributes to a better understanding of service marketing because of the way it brings into perspective various factors affecting consumer self-confidence and its theoretical underpinnings. The main factors include information acquisition, social and personal outcomes, interfaces inherent in the marketplace, and access to persuasion knowledge.
6.     Area of future research Future research should focus on the relationship between different aspects of consumer self-confidence and how they relate to consumer behavior in terms of both correlation and causation.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Bloemer, J 2000, ‘Customer Loyalty in High and Low Involvement Service Settings: The Moderating Impact of Positive Emotions’, Journal of Marketing Management, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 315-330.
2.     Research questions 1.     What role do emotions  play in the relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty?

2.     Do emotions play the same role in both high-involvement and low-involvement settings in regards to satisfaction and loyalty?

3.     Key findings 1.     In service settings, particularly extended services, emotions moderate the relationship between satisfaction among customers and loyalty.

2.     Emotions do not seem to mediate between satisfaction and loyalty in low-involvement purchase settings.

4.     Methodology This journal article is based on a qualitative analysis of empirical studies.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The level of patronage by consumers in high-involvement settings tends to be influenced by the level of their emotional states. These emotional states tend to keep changing throughout the process of service delivery.
6.     Area of future research Researchers need to provide more empirical evidence to determine the precise ways in which customer satisfaction relates to customer loyalty.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Buck, R, Anderson, E, Chaudhuri, A & Ray, I 2004, ‘Emotion and reason in persuasion: Applying the ARI model and the CASC Scale’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 57, pp. 647– 656.
2.     Research questions 1.     How do reason and affect interact in the understanding of persuasion strategies in advertising?

2.     What is the theoretical basis of the emotion-reason relationship in the analysis of consumers’ responses to persuasion and their subsequent behavior?

3.     Key findings 1.     Focus should be on the analysis of emotional factors in efforts to understand how various persuasion strategies are adopted by advertisers.

2.     Both affect and reason need to be put into consideration in the analysis of consumer behavior as demonstrated by their purchase decisions.

3.     An understanding of socio-cognitive and moral aspects of emotional confidence is important in the debate on how different consumers respond to acts of persuasion in service marketing contexts.

 

 

4.     Methodology The paper is based on an analysis of two models: the Communication via Analytic and Syncretic Cognition Scale (CASC Scale) and the affect–reason–involvement (ARI) model. MacLean’s triune theory is relied upon in this study.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing This paper has far-reaching implications for service marketing primarily because of the way in which it emphasizes the importance of both affect and emotion in determining consumer behavior.
6.     Area of future research Future research should focus on the twin aspects of rational and affective aspects of the cognitive process.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Claes, L 2010, ‘Emotional reactivity and self-regulation in relation to compulsive buying’, Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 526–530.
2.     Research questions 1.     How does emotional reactivity relate to compulsive buying?

2.     What is the importance of self-regulation as a strategy for dealing with the problem of compulsive buying

3.     Key findings 1.     Compulsive is associated with high materialism, low level of self-regulation and effortful control, and a high extent of behavioral activation. Emotional reactivity is just one among many elements of this behavioral activation.

2.     Self-regulation is the best behavioral strategy for overcoming compulsive buying. Compulsive buyers tend to lack emotional confidence. Self-regulation is an ideal way through which these buyers can gain emotional confidence.

4.     Methodology The paper is based on the analysis of results obtained after 130 female psychology students filled out three different scales: Compulsive Buying Scale, the Effortful Control Scale/Self Control Scale, and the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Scales.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing This study brings into perspective the role of emotions in one of the most dominant consumer behaviors today: compulsive buying. It contributes to the current debate on how effortful control of emotions can help curb this behavior. Consumers who fail in their quest for effortful control and efforts to subdue their high levels of behavioral activation are assumed to lack emotional confidence.
6.     Area of future research Results indicate that more work in this area should be done to analyze behavioral control strategies and ways of treating compulsive buying.

 

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Howard, D & Gengler, C 2001, ‘Emotional Contagion Effects on Product Attitudes’, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 189-201.
2.     Research questions 1.     What is the rationale for the existence of emotional contagion effects among consumers in service settings?

2.     What is the relationship between the “senders” of emotional cues and the “receivers” of these cues in relation to product attitudes?

3.     Key findings 1.     Emotional contagion effects are often demonstrated when receivers are exposed to happy senders whom they like. This results in a situation where receivers (consumers) develop a positive attitude towards a product.

2.     To understand emotional contagion effects, focus should be on both senders and receivers of emotional cues such as smiling.

4.     Methodology The study was done using two experiments. In the first one, the emotional cue examined was the act of smiling by both the consumer (receiver of the cue)and the seller (sender of the cue). In the second experiment, focus shifted from smiling to facial expressions in general.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The paper demonstrates that in service marketing, emotional contagion is a relevant construct that enables researchers gain a better understanding of consumer behavior.
6.     Area of future research Further research is needed to link the notion of emotional contagion to both emotional confidence and consumer behavior. The implications of this relationship for service marketing theory should also be examined.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Jang, S & Namkung, Y 2009, ‘Perceived quality, emotions, and behavioral intentions: Application of an extended Mehrabian–Russell model to restaurants’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 451–460.
2.     Research questions 1.     What do restaurant-specific emotional stimuli indicate regarding the persistence of positive emotions among consumers?

2.     How can negative emotional responses in restaurant settings be minimized to increase customer satisfaction?

3.     Key findings 1.     Restaurant-specific emotional stimuli indicate that atmospherics and service normally act as stimuli that greatly enhance positive emotions.

2.     Negative emotional responses can be relieved through focus on various attributes of the products such as food quality.

3.     The relationship between future behavior outcomes and atmospherics/services is mediated by positive emotions.

4.     Methodology The paper is based on structural equation modeling in efforts to extend the stimulus-organism-response framework developed by Mehrabian and Russell.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing Positive emotions play a critical role in determining future responses of consumers in restaurant settings. This result is practically and theoretically meaningful because it demonstrates the relationship among three constructs: customer emotions, perceived quality, and behavioral intentions in the context of restaurant consumption experience.
6.     Area of future research More studies need to be undertaken to determine how the three aspects of perceived quality (atmospherics, service, and product) relate to emotional confidence among consumers and the subsequent impact on future consumption decisions.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Machleit, K & Eroglu, S 2000, ‘Describing and Measuring Emotional Response to Shopping Experience’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 101–111.
2.     Research questions 1.     How do shopping environments trigger emotional responses in consumers?

2.     How do these emotional responses influence the consumers’ shopping outcomes and behaviors?

3.     What is the importance of emotional responses in a consumer’s shopping experience?

3.     Key findings 1.     Different shopping environments trigger different emotional responses in consumers.

2.     These emotional responses differ depending on the emotional confidence of a consumer.

3.     Emotional responses greatly determine consumers’ preference for various services although other mediating factors may influence purchase decisions.

4.     Methodology This paper is based on two methods: a descriptive overview of emotions exhibited by consumers in various shopping environments and an empirical comparison of three measures of emotions: Mehrabian and Russell, Plutchik, and Izard.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing For service marketing, an assessment of various emotional responses in shopping environments provides customer service people with a better understanding of consumers’ expectations.
6.     Area of future research The study fails to examine differences in emotional responses among consumers when subjected to the same stimuli. A more consumer-centered approach in this research area is needed. Researchers may also need to examine emotional responses in the context of the purchase of services as opposed to the purchase of physical goods.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Laros, F & Steenkamp, J 2005, ‘Emotions in consumer behavior: A hierarchical approach’ Journal of Business Research, vol. 58, no. 10, pp. 1437–1445.
2.     Research questions 1.     How can the divergent research streams on consumer emotions be integrated into a hierarchical model?

2.     What is the role of emotions in providing information about consumers’ feelings?

3.     Key findings 1.     A hierarchical emotions model can be made by integrating two levels of emotions: the superordinate level consisting of general dimensions of emotions and the subordinate level consisting of specific emotions.

2.     Basic emotions should be relied upon to offer in-depth information regarding consumers’ feelings regarding product and service offerings.

4.     Methodology In this empirical study, a preliminary test is carried out to identify different types of basic emotions based on Richins’ Consumption Emotion Set (CES) and to compare them with superordinate-level emotions.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The outcomes of this research study are relevant for service marketing primarily in regards to the proposed integrated hierarchical emotions model.
6.     Area of future research Research on the integrated emotions model needs to be expanded to facilitate the analysis of other dimensions apart from the hierarchical approach.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Pirog, S & Roberts, J 2007, ‘Personality and Credit Card Misuse Among College Students: The Mediating Role of Impulsiveness’, The Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, vol. 15, no. 1, 65 – 77.
2.     Research questions 1.     What is the role of impulsiveness in the misuse o credit cards among college students?

2.     What does impulsiveness indicating one’s emotional stability?

3.     Key findings 1.     Impulsiveness is a crucial element of one’s personality and it is characterized by four traits: emotional instability, the need for behavioral arousal, materialism and introversion.

2.     Impulsive buyers lack emotional stability/confidence.

4.     Methodology A survey was conducted on 254 college students and the data obtained was analyzed using Mowen’s 3M Hierarchical Model of Personality.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The study puts into perspective the need to examine impulsiveness as one of the central behavioral traits exhibited by consumers. It generate insights into ways in which managers operating in service contexts can develop products that are more friendly to the needs of college students who use credit cards.
6.     Area of future research Future research should analyze in detail how impulsiveness relates with each of the four aforementioned personality traits: emotional instability, the need for behavioral arousal, materialism and introversion.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Yu, Y & Dean, A 2001, ‘The contribution of emotional satisfaction to consumer loyalty’, International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 234 – 250.

 

2.     Research questions 1.     What is the role of emotions in customer satisfaction?

2.     To what extent can emotive aspects of consumer behavior be predicted?

3.     Key findings 1.     Emotions are as important as cognitive aspects in efforts to determine customer satisfaction.

2.     Emotive aspects act as better predictors of consumer loyalty then cognitive aspects.

4.     Methodology This paper takes the form of a regression analysis of cognitive and affective components of satisfaction in relation to consumer loyalty
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The study inspires researchers to examine both cognitive and affective components of consumer satisfaction.
6.     Area of future research Further research should be conducted on differences between positive and negative emotions as indicators of emotional confidence among consumers.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Sweeney, J & Wyber, F 2002, ‘The role of cognitions and emotions in the music-approach-avoidance behavior relationship’, Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 51 – 69.

 

2.     Research questions How does music affect the perceptions of consumers regarding quality?
3.     Key findings 1.     Music influences consumers’ evaluations in four ways: service quality, arousal, pleasure, and merchandize quality.

2.     Music characteristics tend to have an additional impact on pleasure and perceptions of service quality.

4.     Methodology In this theoretical study, the Mehrabian-Russell model is extended to encompass the role of music on customers’ perceptions regarding service quality.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing Individual music tastes should be put into consideration by service marketers in their quest for a better understanding of consumers’ emotional responses.
6.     Area of future research The effect of music on behavioral responses among consumers should be subjected to further research.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Paridon, T, Carraher, S &  Carraher, S 2006, ‘The income effect in personal shopping value, consumer self-confidence, and information sharing (word of mouth communication) research’, Academy of Marketing Studies Journal, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 107-124.
2.     Research questions 1.     How does social self-confidence influence the impact of hedonic experiences by consumers?

2.     How does utilitarian value of a product or service influence personal self-confidence?

3.     Key findings 1.     Social self-confidence mediates the impact of hedonic experiences on word-of-mouth communication.

2.     Both social and personal self-confidence tend to be invariant across levels. However, the latter directly affects perceptions of utilitarian value while the former does not.

4.     Methodology The paper takes the form of a theoretical study.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing Two aspects of self-confidence have been brought to the limelight: personal and social self confidence
6.     Area of future research Conclusive evidence on the impact of personal confidence on word-of-mouth communication needs to be sought.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Sui, J & Baloglu, S  2003, ‘The Role of Emotional Commitment in Relationship Marketing: An Empirical Investigation of a Loyalty Model for Casinos’, Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research, vol. 27, no. 4 pp. 470-489.
2.     Research questions 1.     What is the impact of loyalty in relationship marketing in the context of casinos?

2.     What is the role of emotional attachment in relationship marketing

3.     Key findings 1.     Loyalty is characterized by the emergence of two main behavioral variables: emotional attachment and trust.

2.     Emotional attachment mediates the relationship between attitudinal antecedents (switching costs and trust and behavioral variables (word-of-mouth and time spent by customers in casinos).

4.     Methodology This empirical study was conducted through path analysis with a view to develop and test a loyalty model.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The paper has far-reaching implications on discourse on the relationship between emotional commitment and loyalty.
6.     Area of future research Future studies in the area of emotional commitment should focus on other service sectors such as tourism and restaurant industry.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Smith, A & Bolton, R  2002, ‘The effect of customers’ emotional responses to service failures on their recovery effort evaluations and satisfaction judgments’, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 5-23.

 

2.     Research questions 1.     How do customer emotions affect recovery encounters pursued following service failure?

2.     How do the emotional responses of customers influence how they judgment as far as satisfaction is concerned?

3.     How do emotional responses influence customers’ evaluation of recovery efforts by service providers?

3.     Key findings 1.     Emotional responses affect customers’ evaluations of both satisfaction judgments and recovery efforts.

2.     The effects of emotions may sometimes vary from one industry setting to the other.

4.     Methodology A survey of 355 undergraduate students was carried out in two service settings: hotels and restaurants using self-reported questionnaires.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing In restaurant and hotel settings, the debate on service recovery is centered on four attributes: recovery initiation, compensation, apology, and response speed.
6.     Area of future research More research should be undertaken to investigate the impact of emotions in other study and industry contexts.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Hana, H, Back, K & Barrett, B 2009, ‘Influencing factors on restaurant customers’ revisit intention: The roles of emotions and switching barriers’, International Journal of Hospitality Management, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 563–572.
2.     Research questions 1.     How do consumption emotions, switching barriers, and customer satisfaction affect revisit intention?
3.     Key findings 1.     Multiple elements of consumption emotions have a significant impact on customer satisfaction.

2.     Different aspects of the relationship between customer satisfaction and revisit intention vary across low- and high-switching barrier groups.

4.     Methodology The study is based on structural equation analysis.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing The debate on the relationship between satisfaction and revisit intention should be embraced in the context of environments where switching barriers are inherent with a view to determine the mediating role of consumption emotions.
6.     Area of future research Researchers need to develop an integrated theoretical model that defines relationships among consumption emotions, switching barriers, and customer satisfaction.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Menon, K & Dubé, L 2000, ‘Ensuring greater satisfaction by engineering salesperson response to customer emotions’, Journal of Retailing, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 285–307.
2.     Research questions 1.     How can sales persons respond to customer emotions to contribute to greater satisfaction?

2.     How can retail managers and salespersons respond to customers’ normative expectations and subsequent emotional responses to increase satisfaction?

3.     Key findings 1.     Both positive and negative emotions provide crucial information regarding how customers respond to salespersons’ normative responses to consumer behavior.

2.     Retail managers should integrate analytical evaluations of customers’ emotional responses into their overall retail strategy.

4.     Methodology In this empirical study, two positive emotions (joy and delight) and two negative emotions (anger and anxiety) are tested to determine how salespersons can contribute to greater satisfaction in the context of two retail stores.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing Customer satisfaction is a crucial requirement particularly in situations where repeat purchase is critical to the success of a service marketing strategy.
6.     Area of future research Future research should investigate whether positive emotional responses are linked greater customer satisfaction and repeat purchase.

 

18.

1.     Title/Journal academics Chebat, J & Slusarczyk, W 2005, ‘How emotions mediate the effects of perceived justice on loyalty in service recovery situations: An empirical study’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 664–673.
2.     Research questions How are the effects of justice on customer loyalty in service recovery situations mediated by negative and positive emotions in retail banking contexts?
3.     Key findings 1.     Each of the three dimensions of justice (interactive, procedural, and distributive) affects customer loyalty in different ways.

2.     Interactional justice such as courtesy is dominant by virtue of affecting both negative and positive emotions.

4.     Methodology The research takes the form of an empirical study that is based on two theories: Affect Control Theory (ACT) and Justice Theory.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing Different dimensions of justice constitute an important area of analysis in service marketing. They provide insights into differences in levels of emotional confidence among different consumers.
6.     Area of future research Very few studies have applied the Affect Control Theory (ACT) and Justice Theory in the analysis of emotional confidence among consumers in service settings. Future empirical studies should employ the two theories in the analysis of these thematic areas.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics DeWitt, T, Nguyen, D & Marshall, R 2008, ‘Exploring Customer Loyalty Following Service Recovery: The Mediating Effects of Trust and Emotions’, Journal of Service Research, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 269-281.
2.     Research questions What is the role of trust and emotions in the analysis of the relationship between customer loyalty and perceived justice in the service recovery process?
3.     Key findings 1.     Emotions and trust play a crucial mediating role in the process of service recovery.

2.     Both positive and negative emotions need to be investigated in studies on customer perceptions during service recovery.

4.     Methodology The paper uses the structural equation model test the cognitive appraisal model of trust and emotions.
5.     Area literature/ service marketing This study stimulates the emergence of new approaches that build upon existing knowledge of the role of emotions and trust in the service recovery process.
6.     Area of future research More attention should be on the role of trust as well as both dimensions (positive and negative) of emotion in determining how consumers respond to efforts by service providers to initiate recovery processes. More importantly, the studies should evaluate how emotion influences changes in consumer behavior in “repeat purchase” contexts.

 

1.     Title/Journal academics Varela-Neira, C, Vázquez-Casielles, R & Iglesias-Argüelles, 2008, ‘The influence of emotions on customer’s cognitive evaluations and satisfaction in a service failure and recovery context’, The Service Industries Journal, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 497-512.
2.     Research questions  
3.     Key findings 1.     Customers tend to rely on both emotions and cognitive evaluation in determine the level of cumulative satisfaction with the services provided.

2.     Cognitive evaluations have a direct impact on cumulative satisfaction while emotions have an indirect impact on the same.

4.     Methodology  
5.     Area literature/ service marketing In all service marketing contexts, service failure is a reality. By focusing on the idea of cumulative satisfaction, service marketers can reorient their mindsets and approaches to be able to focus on ways of ensuring that most of the service encounters end up in success.
6.     Area of future research Researchers who are interested in the theme of service recovery should dwell primarily on the minimization of the occurrence of negative emotional responses as a way of improving customers’ cognitive evaluations of service quality.

 

 

References

Bar-On, R 2010, ‘Emotional Intelligence: An Integral Part of Positive Psychology’, South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 54-62.

Bearden, W, Hardesty, D & Rose, R 2001, ‘Consumer Self‐Confidence: Refinements in Conceptualization and Measurement’, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 121-134.

Bloemer, J 2000, ‘Customer Loyalty in High and Low Involvement Service Settings: The Moderating Impact of Positive Emotions’, Journal of Marketing Management, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 315-330.

Buck, R, Anderson, E, Chaudhuri, A & Ray, I 2004, ‘Emotion and reason in persuasion: Applying the ARI model and the CASC Scale’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 57, pp. 647– 656.

Chebat, J & Slusarczyk, W 2005, ‘How emotions mediate the effects of perceived justice on loyalty in service recovery situations: An empirical study’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 664–673.

Claes, L (2010), ‘Emotional reactivity and self-regulation in relation to compulsive buying’, Personality and Individual Differences, vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 526–530.

DeWitt, T, Nguyen, D & Marshall, R 2008, ‘Exploring Customer Loyalty Following Service Recovery: The Mediating Effects of Trust and Emotions’, Journal of Service Research, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 269-281.

Hana, H, Back, K & Barrett, B 2009, ‘Influencing factors on restaurant customers’ revisit intention: The roles of emotions and switching barriers’, International Journal of Hospitality Management, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 563–572.

Howard, D & Gengler, C 2001, ‘Emotional Contagion Effects on Product Attitudes’, Journal of Consumer Research, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 189-201.

Jang, S & Namkung, Y 2009, ‘Perceived quality, emotions, and behavioral intentions: Application of an extended Mehrabian–Russell model to restaurants’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 451–460.

Laros, F & Steenkamp, J 2005, ‘Emotions in consumer behavior: A hierarchical approach’ Journal of Business Research, vol. 58, no. 10, pp. 1437–1445.

Machleit, K & Eroglu, S 2000, ‘Describing and Measuring Emotional Response to Shopping Experience’, Journal of Business Research, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 101–111.

Menon, K & Dubé, L 2000, ‘Ensuring greater satisfaction by engineering salesperson response to customer emotions’, Journal of Retailing, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 285–307.

Paridon, T, Carraher, S &  Carraher, S 2006, ‘The income effect in personal shopping value, consumer self-confidence, and information sharing (word of mouth communication) research’, Academy of Marketing Studies Journal, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 107-124.

Pirog, S & Roberts, J 2007, ‘Personality and Credit Card Misuse Among College Students: The Mediating Role of Impulsiveness’, The Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, vol. 15, no. 1, 65 – 77.

Smith, A & Bolton, R  2002, ‘The effect of customers’ emotional responses to service failures on their recovery effort evaluations and satisfaction judgments’, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 5-23.

Sui, J & Baloglu, S  2003, ‘The Role of Emotional Commitment in Relationship Marketing: An Empirical Investigation of a Loyalty Model for Casinos’, Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research, vol. 27, no. 4 pp. 470-489.

Sweeney, J & Wyber, F 2002, ‘The role of cognitions and emotions in the music-approach-avoidance behavior relationship’, Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 51 – 69.

Varela-Neira, C, Vázquez-Casielles, R & Iglesias-Argüelles, 2008, ‘The influence of emotions on customer’s cognitive evaluations and satisfaction in a service failure and recovery context’, The Service Industries Journal, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 497-512.

Yu, Y & Dean, A 2001, ‘The contribution of emotional satisfaction to consumer loyalty’, International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 234 – 250.

Get a 15 % discount on an order above $ 30
Use the following coupon code :
tpc15
Our Services:
  • Essay
  • Custom Essays
  • Homework Help
  • Research Papers
  • Argumentative Essay
  • Assignment
  • College Papers
  • Powerpoint Presentation
  • Dissertation
  • Thesis Paper
  • Dissertation
  • Editing Services
  • Review Writing
  • Lab Report
  • Book Report
  • Article Critique
  • Case Study
  • Coursework
  • Term Paper
  • Personal Statement
Order a customized paper today!